Statistics Applets

 

This page was initially created in May 2000 by BB&N AP Statistics student Nick Reber ('02). An equal amount of work was done by Andrew Warner ('04) in May 2002. Evaluations are their own and are not edited by BB&N.



Sites with Useful Applets

Rice University Virtual Lab in Statistics

A large selection of applets, covering most AP Statistics topics. Some of these applets are very basic, but many are complex and sometimes confusing.



University of South Carolina Statistics Department

This site contains a wide variety of applets. Some of these applets resemble games while others are more complex.



Russ Lenth's Power and Sample Size Page

This site contains 7 applets relating to Power and Sample Sizes, including applets for various tests.



UAH Mathematical Sciences Applets Page

This page contains a wide variety of applets, some of which are contained in the AP statistics course, and some of which are not.



Statlab - Laboratory for Statistics

This site contains a large amount of applets including applets for the geometrical distribution, descriptive statistics, special distributions, and goodness of fit. Some of these applets are based on games, or explain how games work.



Econ 222 Homepage for Statistics - Applets

This is a page that includes applets dealing with different types of distributions.



Todd Ogden, Professor at USC, Homepage for Statistics

This is the home page of a professor of statistics from the University of South Carolina. This site contains a few useful applets.




Applets By Topic

 

Distributions

Effect of Bin Width on Interpretting Histograms. This applet shows the influence the number of bins on an Old Faithful duration data set.

Empirical Rule Demonstration

From West Applets

Mean and Median This is a simple but very useful applet that lets you draw a distribution and then calculates the mean, median and standard deviation.

From Rice University Applets.

 

Sampling Distributions

Chi-Squared Distribution This applet shows the Chi-Sq distribution for a given degrees of freedom. It also allows you to set a value and find the probability that a random value X is less than this given value for the degrees of freedom given.

From Econ 222 Homepage for Statistics - Applets

Binomial Distribution Applet This simple applet shows the binomial distribution for a given n and p. The blue line indicates the expected count, while the red area gives the expected interval

From Econ 222 Homepage for Statistics - Applets

 

Binomial Applet this simple applet allows you to toss a certain number of coins and see the expected distribution. It also allows you to take many samples to see how the distribution eventually settles to the expected distribution.

From UAH Mathematical Science and Applets Page

 

Sampling Distribution This applet lets you choose a parent population (normal, uniform, skewed or custom) and for different sample sizes shows a resulting sampling distribution. This is a good applet, except the graphics are a little too small to see the fine differences in distribution shapes.

From Rice University Applets.

 

Dice CLT This applet simulates rolling dice (you can choose 1-5 dice) repeatedly and recording the sum of the dies. As the number of dice increases, the sampling distribution gets more normal.

From University of South Carolina Applets.

 

Multiple Dice CLT This applet lets you roll 1, 3,6 or 9 dice repeatedly and then shows the sampling distribution. It is clearer than the "Dice CLT" but does not re-scale the sampling distribution and perhaps not quite as useful.

From Chuck Stanton's Home Page.

 

Falling balls into a Normal Distribution This is a very clever and interesting applet that has balls fall through a field of blocks. The balls collect at the bottom of the screen, as it turns out, in a normal distribution. This applet is not as much useful as it is a creative way of looking at a normal distribution.

From U of T Day Statistics Applets.

Confidence Intervals

CI for sample mean click on this applet in the box on the left and click "run applet". This applet allows you to change the components of the confidence interval for a sample mean to find out how that would affect the interval.

From Russ Lenth's Power and Sample Size Page

 

CI for one Proportion click on this applet in the box on the left and click "run applet". This applet allows you to change the components of the confidence interval for one proportion to find out how that would affect the interval

From Russ Lenth's Power and Sample Size Page

 

Confidence Intervals In this applet, samples are drawn from a population. Then confidence intervals are created from these samples. The overall proportion of 95% and 99% confidence intervals that contain the population mean is tabulated. This is a useful applet, but, it does not calculate the confidence intervals in front of you, so you cannot directly see where they came from.

From Rice University Applets.

 

Confidence Interval for a Proportion This applet lets you explore the validity of confidence intervals by varying the sample size and the population proportion. After choosing both an "n" and a "p" you simulate many samples. The applet returns the proportion of 95% confidence intervals that actually contained the population proportion.

From Rice University Applets.

 

Confidence Interval for Means This is a great applet that samples many sets of data and plots the population mean, the data and the confidence interval all on the same graph.

From Chuck Stanton's Home Page.

 

Regression

Influential Points This applet provides a data set and resulting regression line and then lets you add another point and compare the new regression, including the added point, to the old one. Using this applet, it is clear which points are influential to a linear model.

From University of South Carolina Applets.

 

Regression by Adding Points This applet lets you plot points by clicking with your mouse and then calculates the linear regression line and the residual plot.

From Chuck Stanton's Home Page.

 

Tests of Significance

One proportion test click on this applet in the box on the left and click "run applet". This is a simple applet that allows you to see the effect of changing the components of a one proportion test to see how that would affect the p-value of the test.

From Russ Lenth's Power and Sample Size Page

 

Two proportion test click on this applet in the box on the left and click "run applet". This is a simple applet that allows you to see the effect of changing the components of a two proportion test to see how that would affect the p-value of the test.

From Russ Lenth's power and Sample Size Page

 

One sample t test click on this applet in the box on the left and click "run applet". This is a simple applet that allows you to see the effect of changing the components of a one sample t test to see how that would affect the p-value of the test.

From Russ Lenth's Power and Sample Size Page

 

Two sample t test click on this applet in the box on the left and click "run applet". This is a simple applet that allows you to see the effect of changing the components of a two sample t test to see how that would affect the p-value of the test.

From Russ Lenth's Power and Sample Size Page

 

Probability

Venn Diagram Applet This applet displays what areas of a Venn diagram for two different not-mutually exclusive events, and shades the areas corresponding to the conditions that you set.

From UAH Mathematical Sciences and Applets Page

 

Dice Experiment Applet This applet allows you to simulate the rolling of up to 20 dice, and gives an expected distribution and shows how the data eventually fits this data. The probability of getting a single number on the die (i.e. a 1) can be adjusted as well. The graph can be adjusted to display different aspects of the dice rolling.

From UAH Mathematical Sciences and Applets Page

 

Power

Power Applet This simple applet allows you to compute power for a given True Mean, Hypothesized mean, sigma, and N. (you must input these parameters in the given text boxes before the graph will appear!)

From Todd Ogden, Professor at USC, Homepage for Statistics